Pork belly and shiitake ramen

Recipe from: 29 July 2016
pork, recipe, food24

Ingredients 31
Servings 1
Minutes 15 min

Ingredients

Serving Change
  • Broth:
  • 1.5
    kg
    pork trotters or pork bones
  • 1
    large onion quartered (leave skin on, this adds colour and depth)
  • 2
    large carrots sliced
  • 2
    celery sticks, chopped
  • 5
    ml
    fennel leaves, optional
  • 5
    ml
    szechuan peppercorns or black peppercorns
  • 40
    g
    dried shitake mushrooms or mixed exotic – optional
  • 4
    l
    chicken stock
  • 45
    ml
    grated ginger
  • 10-15
    ml
    chilli paste
  • 3
    cloves
    garlic, crushed
  • 3
    star anise (optional)
  • 15
    ml
    miso paste
  • To season:
  • 30
    ml
    soy sauce
  • 30
    ml
    ponzu (citrus soy seasoning)
  • 10
    ml
    chilli paste (optional)
  • 30
    ml
    ginger, finely grated
  • 5
    ml
    tamarind or rice vinegar
  • 5
    ml
    sesame oil
  • 8
    pork rashers, 2cm thick
  • 15
    ml
    vegetable oil
  • 340
    g
    egg noodles
  • 4
    soft boiled eggs halved (boil for 5 minutes)
  • 4
    spring onions, thinly sliced
  • 1
    cucumber, julienned and pickled in rice wine vinegar
  • red chilli, sliced
  • fresh coriander
  • sesame seeds
  • sesame oil
 

Method

15 min
 

Preheat the oven to 200 °C

Place the pork trotter or bones, onion, carrot, celery, fennel seeds and pepper onto a roasting tray. Roast for 30 minutes to get the caramelisation going.


Tie half of the dried mushrooms in a muslin cloth. Pour the chicken stock into a large pot ( I use AMC Cookware’s 24 cm Gourmet High saucepan).


Add the mushrooms in muslin, ginger, chill paste, garlic, star anise and miso paste.Bring to a simmer. Add the roasted bones and veggies to the stock, bring to the boil, then simmer for at least 3 hours. Or use a slow cooker and simmer gently for 6 hours.  Remove mushroom muslin and set aside. Strain the stock, removing all the bones and veggie bits. Pour the strained stock/broth back into the pot.


Add the mushrooms that were in the muslin cloth as well as the remaining half of the mushrooms.


Season with soy and ponzu sauce and even more ginger and chilli according to taste. Add the tamarind or vinegar for acidity and a little bit of sesame oil to taste. Simmer for 30 minutes. Set aside.


Turn oven temperature down to 160 °C

Place pork rashers in a deep baking tray. Pour the stock over the rashers until they are covered (You won’t need to use all of it, keep the rest aside for later). Top with a piece of baking paper and another baking tray that fits snug into the other creating a weight on the rashers.


Roast for 1 hour 20 minutes or until the meat falls apart and the fat is super soft. Remove any little bones that may still be in the rashers [and nibble on them, yay!].  Gently remove rashers from the baking tray and chill until ready to brown in a pan and serve. Because they are so amazingly tender, it’s a good idea to chill them for at least 30 minutes in the fridge before frying. This will firm them up!


Pour the stock used for cooking the pork rashers into the pot with the remaining seasoned broth.


When ready to serve, bring the broth to the boil and cook the noodles until aldente.


Meanwhile in a dry pan ( I use AMC Cookware’s 24 cm Chef’s Pan), brown the cooked pork rashers in batches until crispy and golden brown on the outside.


Serve the steaming hot cooked noodles and broth (make sure you fish out lots of shitake) in large bowls. Top generously with pork belly rashers, boiled egg, spring onion, pickled cucumber, chilli, sesame seeds and fresh coriander. Drizzle lightly with sesame oil.

Slurp away!



Recipe reprinted with permission of Bits of Carey. To see more recipes, please click here.


To receive quick and convenient weekday recipes, join our Easy Weekday Meals mailing list, and for up-to-date trending food, restaurant and wine news subscribe to our Editor’s Weekly newsletter. 

 

Read more on: recipe  |  food24  |  pork
 

NEXT ON FOOD24X
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.